10 Inputs for Rookie Employees (Fresh graduates, I see you!)

As I celebrate 10 years since my first employment, please allow me, dear reader to give unsolicited advice for those who, for the first time are reveling in the wonderful world that is: the workplace.

1- Just how urgent are urgent tasks?

They are pretty urgent. However, a common rookie mistake is to be stressed because their superiors would give them five tasks that are simultaneously labelled as URGENT. The more prepared interns/fresh graduates would pause and actually ask, “Okay, but which of these is the MOST urgent?”. To which the manager would respond, “All of them are equally urgent”. This is a lie. Because even if you, little grasshopper, are a wizard of all sorts and were able to finish all the tasks punctually, your manager CAN NOT POSSIBLY revise them all at the same time.

This is why I would suggest you rather ask, “Which of all these urgent tasks would you like to revise first? Could you give me a deadline for each of them?”. This means that your manager would have to sit down for 5 minutes with you and decide, say, Task 1 should be on his desk in 1 hour, Task 2 to be submitted in 2 hours, Task 3 in 2 hours and a half, etc… And if he refuses to do this, then feel at liberty to prioritize the work yourself.

Tip from my mother: If your manager DID sit down and classify the tasks with you, remember to write him an email confirming what you just talked about. This would be your safeguard against any future “misunderstandings”.

2- Gossiping is One Train You Should Not Hop On

Avoid gossip. Even if you’re only a “listener” and not a “contributor”, do not be around people who gossip. It’s a waste of time and it only brings distraction. Besides, being a “listener” is just as bad as contributing because it means tolerating trash talk about somebody who can’t give his side of the story.

If you want something cleared up, talk to the person face to face. Also, don’t criticize anyone behind their backs unless you’re 100% sure you can repeat the same words in front of them.

Most importantly: Don’t use gossip as a weapon if you’re not sure you can take the fire.

3- Doubts Will Arise

I know 40-year olds who are still not sure what they want to do with their current lives, let alone their future. So be kind to yourself and consider that as a young person starting to explore a new world, it’s only natural to feel doubtful and undecided about things.

NEVER be afraid to take a step back and evaluate your situation. If you feel the need to go back to studying, take a sabbatical, change career directions, or whatever you feel that could make you grow, go for it.

Still, it’s absolutely important that you be clear on your purpose. Ask yourself, “Why am I doing this?” Is it for the money? for personal needs? for professional fulfillment? or for sheer curiosity? Afterwards, ask yourself again, “Would this change be able to sustain me until I get my bearings back?”

4- Is it Wise to Mix Personal and Professional Life by Making Friends at Work?

Personally, I think it matters little whether this is wise or otherwise (pun intended). Human beings are social animals so whether we like it or not, we will always be drawn to gatherings, socializing and eventually consolidating one “favorite” group of people from work. What is wise though, is to choose your work friends prudently.

In this light, think 50 times over whether it’s worth “hooking” up with an office mate. ‘Nuf said.

5- Honesty Really IS the Best Policy

Be as honest and frank as possible with your direct manager. Even if she isn’t totally honest with you, be transparent with them with whatever issue you have that might affect the quality of your work.

Your manager’s lack of “honesty” could be explained by the fact that some work-related subjects should remain only in the hands of the “upper crust”. I’m not talking about this kind of honesty. Any topic that relates directly to you or your work is a topic you have the right to know about. Similarly, your manager has the right to be informed about anything that could directly affect the accomplishment of the objectives she set for you.

In my case, I opened up to my former supervisor regarding my problem when I get hungry. You might think this is an exaggeration, but “cranky” is an understatement in this case because I would suffer a complete shut down of all my systems: I become a friend of none and an enemy to all, I make bad choices, I start remembering past offenses… try to get the idea of that kind of co-worker.

6- Drop the Delegation Drama

KNOW that it is your manager’s obligation to properly train you for whatever is written under your job description. He should know that whatever mistakes you (or anybody else under his supervision) make would directly reflect on his performance. So if he’s wise, he would adequately teach you everything you need to know to deliver a quality output. If he’s not, he would hoard all the tasks while you sit on the sidelines- that way, the deliverable would be quasi-perfect and he would not risk his attention being called.

One of my former managers was like this. I described the experience in this post.

As a newbie, it would be normal for some time to pass before some major decisions or operations are to be delegated to you. But don’t lose heart: it will come. And the first step towards that direction is to reflect the seal of excellence in every deliverable that bears your name.

7- The Value of Knowing Your Place

When you argue with your boss, LET YOUR OBJECTIVE BE TO BE HEARD and not to win/change his mind/make him side with you. While you’re at it, be as eloquent, as respectful and as precise as you can be when letting yourself be heard.

Trying to get into an argumentative battle with a superior will only leave you badly wounded and demoralized. Think about it: managers have had years and years of “training”, having had more experience in almost any type of arguments in this life. Sometimes, a smile is the best response. This way, you save time which you could use later on for whatever you wish for! PLUS, you save energy and keep your happiness.

8- Commitment Issues

It’s okay for you not to love your job. However, don’t make it an excuse to under perform.

It’s very important to leave a good impression in your job, especially if it’s the first one, and you achieve this by committing to produce the best results you possibly could.

Talking to a friend the other day, we both agreed that nothing is forever. But if we want something to last, there should be a conscious effort from our side to wake up each day and make a decision to get through the day, everyday. Work-wise, it’s the same.

In my opinion, problems could arise the moment your job starts to go against your values. A friend once told me she turned down an offer from a company that manufactures weapons for war. Another one told me that he had to leave his former company because ethically, he didn’t agree with its new strategy. When this happens, thoroughly weigh your options and be realistic about how you’re going to pay the bills and fund your dreams when a regular flow of income gets cut off.

9- Understand Your Contract

Back in France: each time I signed a new contract, an HR personnel was always beside me and ready to answer any questions I might have. Even if I took my sweet time to carefully read the 12-page document, they would patiently wait without interrupting me. They would explain anything, from something as simple as the personal tax deducted each month, to something more complex such as the legislation applicable to my situation.

Even more necessary is for you to understand your paycheck or pay stub. Keep track of your monthly expenses starting with the automatic deductions from your revenues. Don’t forget, you’re “adulting” now!

10- LET GO OF EXPECTATIONS

This final advice is the toughest one I’ve learned, because I’ve known it to be true for quite some time now.

I know it works for everyone who has tried it. However, I just wasn’t able to apply it in my own life. Now that I’ve started to do so, I’m much more fulfilled and happier than ever before.

The key to peace of mind is: not to expect anything. One thing is to bear in mind things like: scheduled meetings, DEADLINES, patterns of behavior and so on… but another thing is to be open-minded enough to ACCEPT THAT EVERYTHING IS SUSCEPTIBLE TO CHANGE. Remember, disappointments only exist because they were pre-determined by an expectation or two. So in this equation, the less we expect, the less we tend to be disappointed!

Adulting and Money Management (3.3): The Money that I Owe

Adulting and Money Management (3.3): The Money that I Owe

On How I Acquired Loans Responsibly

The first time I formally owed money was when I took on a store credit to buy a bed. I was 22 years old and just moved out of my parents’ house.

Needless to say, I was very nervous when I signed the papers. I grew up in a family where borrowing money is a big no-no and I have always been told that it could bring a lot of misery and trouble. I’ve seen families fight, children who cut all contact with parents and even friends who stopped talking to each other because of money lent and borrowed to one another. Because of all that, I was afraid to get any kind of credit and was doubtful about my ability to honor the payments. It didn’t matter that I had a one year contract at work, neither that I had 8 months to pay it off, nor the fact that there was no interest rate applied (the store had a special promotion).

Knowing what I know now, I only wish somebody could’ve told me that:

  1. at some point in life, it would be necessary for me to borrow money,
  2. there are ways to not be enslaved by loans and,
  3. it is possible to live happily with debt, if one borrowed money responsibly.

Resultado de imagen de responsible loan

Image courtesy of: http://mzansilive.co.za/

The importance of taking the time to honestly reflect

So far, no debt has financially strained me to a cracking point. I guess the reason is because I think more than twice before acquiring a loan of any kind. All the scary stories and the horrible experiences I witnessed from peers and friends have served as a starting point in each and every debt decision I’ve ever made.

I usually go by the motto, “If you can’t buy it in cash, you can’t afford it”. So whenever faced with a buying dilemma, first I evaluate the usefulness or the value of what I’m going to buy:

-How long will I use/enjoy the item?

-Will its value increase our decrease over time?

-Can I sell the item if I find it of no use to me in the future?

Secondly, I examine my current financial standing:

-Why can’t I afford it?

-Is it a problem of liquidity (availability of cash or other means of payment), or a matter of really not having enough resources to purchase the item?

-Can I perhaps save for it today and buy it in the future? Or would the item increase in price by the time I have enough money saved?

Lastly, I make sure that paying for such debt would not cause a great dent on my future quality of life. Technically, this could be achieved none other than by sitting in front of a calculator, pen and paper (or a spreadsheet) and start crunching the numbers.

When choosing a creditor, go with the one who offers the best terms of payment FOR YOU

You might ask, “How is it even possible to have a debt and live comfortably?”. It IS possible.

The first condition certainly would be to not overwhelm yourself with loans. Borrow only the amount that you are able to return.

Equally important is that this could be achieved if you invest time and effort in searching for a creditor whose terms of payments suit your situation.

Below, I’ve made a list of the most important purchases I’ve made on credit. All of them have one thing in common: I got them at 0% interest rate. This is where the time and effort came in: once I set my mind to getting something extra-special that needs a financial sacrifice (debts make you sacrifice your future purchasing capacity), I start browsing the market (virtually and physically) for different kinds of offer. Personally, I prefer to go to a physical store and talk to the salesperson. I’ve always gotten the best deals through one-on-one negotiations.

Some stores give you the option to determine how many installments (usually in months) you need to pay the credit off. In these cases, I always chose the least possible. The soonest I can get out of the debt, the better.

Past credits to stores:

  1. Bed: 8 months
  2. Thermomix: 3 months
  3. Wedding earrings: 3 months
  4. House appliances (dishwasher, refrigerator and microwave oven): 4 months

Credit card debts (payable 3 months after purchase):

  1. Plane tickets
  2. Hotel reservations

Outstanding debt:

  1. Student Loan

The role of emergency savings

It’s important for me to briefly discuss something about my outstanding debt.

As I’ve said, I don’t pay interest for this loan. So every month, a flat rate gets deducted from my bank account. This would go on until the principal amount has been paid off; and according to the terms I signed, it would still take some time before I see that day arrive. This is to say that the greatest risk I face is the suspension of my steady revenue flow before fully paying the loan; in my case, it will be unemployment.

Truth be told, I actually faced this situation not long ago. I lost my job, but luckily I was eligible to receive unemployment allowance. However that too, was a limited source of income. So when it got depleted, I had to tap my savings- my emergency savings. I had to set aside such amount that would allow for one whole year of payment for this loan while I search for a job. (I simply decided that it would take me one more year before getting back to work.)

Fortunately I am now back to having a salaried employment, and it didn’t take me one year!

Resultado de imagen de responsible debt

Image courtesy of: https://www.agingcare.com

So now, until that debt gets paid off, I consider each monthly installment just as I budget fixed household costs (ie: rent, electricity, water, food, etc…), like what my friend Edward mentioned in this post. At the same time, I exert a conscious effort to increase my savings, especially my emergency savings.

I am aware that most people’s idea of having emergency savings is for it to be used during a health crisis, a natural calamity or the death of a loved one. But emergency savings also have to cover whatever household needs there are when the regular flow of income is interrupted, or reduced.

DO NOT TAKE UP LOANS FOR THINGS YOU DON’T REALLY NEED

Half a year after having a regular job with a stable salary deposited in my bank account, I also started to receive letters from the bank informing that I have automatically secured a 3,000-Euro loan! I also got an instant approval to avail a “golden” credit card from the same bank. To top it all, my husband also got the same letters!

We just threw those in the garbage.

My husband and I could’ve enjoyed the “easy” money back then. But we decided to be frugal and live within our real means.

On Personal Loans

My attitude towards personal loans is even more strict and rigorous than with the formal ones. As far as relationships go, I try very hard not to let money get in the way. Actually, the best way to preserve a relationship is to set money matters aside. But when times get tough, to whom would one go for help? To a friend or family member, right?

In my limited experience on personal loans, I’ve always carefully chosen the people who I plan to borrow money from. They should be financially comfortable enough to lend the amount I will ask, without having to sacrifice their quality of living. They should also be people I greatly trust and who trust me equally. Additionally, I choose those who I believe are unafraid to call my attention in case I forget to pay, or give them the incorrect amount.

It’s very important to be clear that the money being passed from one person to another is eventually going to be returned the other way around. If you’re lucky to have a friend or family member who would insist that the money be a gift instead of a loan, then enjoy! Otherwise, be clear on the terms of payment: interest rate, installments, “deadline”, and so forth. Trust me, it’s not worth losing a loved one over money.

Responsible borrowing

Acquiring loans responsibly takes a lot of time and effort, just like any other “adulting” activity. Although compared with other “adulting” decisions, this will cause a direct and immediate effect on your quality of life in the near future- once the payments set in.

It would seem boring and tiresome but it’s worth thinking more than twice before deciding to take up a loan. Then once the decision has been made, it becomes even more important to take a moment to search for the most suitable creditor and to plan your new budget considering the periodic installments.

Borrowing responsibly also means being prepared for various risks that might mean having difficulty in making the payments (such as being unemployed). For this reason, it’s important to factor in an additional amount in one’s emergency savings when preparing the new budget.

One risk worth remembering is the temptation of acquiring an “easy” loan with seemingly “comfortable” terms and conditions. I have never heard of anybody live comfortably with a loan that was used for something they didn’t really need.

Lastly, responsible borrowing entails mixing personal and financial affairs the least possible. Though when inevitable, another round of reflection, research and budgeting has to be made, all in order to be able to live happily even when indebted.

Resultado de imagen de responsible borrowing

Image courtesy of: http://www.smartcampaign.org/