Adulting and Money Management 2: “Hooray, I have money! now what?”

To read the first part of the Adulting and Money Management Series, click here.

Money management becomes tricky as we grow older. To prove my point, try to remember when you were younger and you used to be so determined and focused to save whatever money you had. It could be to buy “that shirt”, “that book”, “that pair of shoes”, or even just to “put it in the bank”.

Didn’t you use to scrimp on buying snacks at school? didn’t you keep those envelopes containing cash- from your godparents- so you wouldn’t be tempted to use it? didn’t you try to outsmart your parents, siblings, or other family members to cover some of your expenses so that you could have more money, faster?

By the time we enter into adulthood, we start to be distracted from goals such as saving money or even increasing our income… There are just so many nice things to buy, a lot of delicious new food to taste, and look at all those places where we could travel- am I right?

Imagen relacionada

Image courtesy of: http://www.jocelynrish.com/

I don’t have the capacity to address all the above-mentioned concerns. However today, in the name of “adulting”, allow me to shine a spotlight on investment as an alternative to increase the money you have saved. And as a possible choice for investment, this post will also include a short discussion about Mutual Funds.

The completion of this second part of the Adulting and Money Management Series would not be possible without the very dependable Mr. Arnel Martil. His professional aid/opinion/words/common sense/truthslaps have truly made this post not only satisfactory, but also very beneficial to the reader.

Thank you very much, Arnel for your help!

-*-

Colorfulifesite (C): Arnel, what’s the difference between saving and investing? Which would you say is more important between the two? For instance, let’s say that I just received an inheritance or a huge bonus. Which should be my priority?

Arnel (A): The big difference between savings and investments is time.

Savings is usually money you set aside for short-term goals.

One reason you might want to save now is so you have some money to invest later. Money deposited into a savings account is usually very safe but would only earn a small amount of money in return. Another great thing about a savings account is you can get your money out of the account whenever you want.

When you say saving, you are just putting your money in a bank or as a reserve. It’s as if you’re hiding it under your pillow. It is a “parking place” where the “principal” or the amount you’ve saved is safe; it provides money for short term goals as well as emergencies.

By investing, you allow your money to grow. 

It accumulates money for long-term goals. You could lose your principal, but you have the opportunity to earn more money.

When you invest, you set your money aside for future income, benefit or profit to meet long-term goals. When you invest your money, there is no guarantee that your money will grow or increase. The earnings or losses from investments are usually more than what you would make or lose in a savings account. Investors recognize that it usually takes a long time to earn the big bucks, so most of the time they are in it for the long haul.

C: What would you say is the NUMBER ONE enemy of the people who are currently saving money? What’s the most effective technique you’ve applied to make sure you or your family could save?

A: Inflation is one of the downsides if we rely only on saving. It is an increase in price that makes a “market baskets” of goods and services more expensive over time- a silent killer of your finances. (Note: inflation reduces the value of your money because with the same amount, it can purchase less goods and services than before.)

For us to beat inflation, we should invest in investment vehicles like bonds, stocks, mutual fund, UITF or Unit Investment Trust Fund* (see Glossary at the end of the article for more information on terms with asterisks), or real estate. As an adviser, we do not discourage saving money in a bank account because you can recover and use that money 24/7 in case of an emergency. But if you want something for long term, like if you are planning for future education or personal retirement, invest in a vehicle that allows your money to grow if done right… annual returns of 50% is possible.

Regarding saving techniques, it really depends on the person’s budget; it should be such that his lifestyle wouldn’t be compromised. 

C: The most typical advice is the 20-60-20 rule, where 20% of a person’s income should go to savings and investment, 60% on essential expenses and 20% on discretionary expenses a.k.a. wants, rather than needs. (For some insight on budgeting and saving, see Colorfulifesite Blog’s post on making ends meet, here and proving that you could save, here.)

A: Just remember that the bottom line is saving for your future.

C: Suppose I’m now ready to invest- will it make sense for me to borrow the money I would put in the investment vehicle of my choice?

A: As an adviser I would say, before you decide to invest, you should settle your debts first.

You must start paying off the ones with small interest, and little by little, proceed by paying loans with bigger interest. The reason for this is you might have difficulties if you prioritize the debts with bigger interest, because there’s a tendency it might be too much for you and it could lead to you not being able to continue paying.

Once the debt is settled, you can then start to save and invest.

C: In my opinion, borrowing money can be a useful tool for money management. But it can also spell disaster for anyone who misuses it. Under the context of making your money grow, I believe that it only makes sense to take a loan when:

You are 100% sure that you could pay it off, interest plus principal, without sacrificing neither your current lifestyle nor your future prospects. (More of this on this series’ next post!)

A: You can be financially independent at any income level, but one should develop a certain behavior and discipline when saving and not to spend too much. However big your monthly salary is, even at 100 thousand per month, if your mentality is all about spending and spending, the end result will be an impoverished you.

C: Now, I noticed that mutual funds have been “a thing” for quite some time. What can you tell us about it?

A: Mutual funds are pooled investments which everyone can participate in. In the Philippines, it could be with capital as little as Php 5,000.00 (Colorfulifesite advises for you to consult your bank or financial adviser for the minimum capital requirements in your country).

It is a good investment option because they do not require much effort and time compared to others (e.g stocks, one’s own business). A professional fund manager handles your mutual fund. All you need to do is put in the money. In a mutual fund, you will become an investor, part-owner or shareholder of blue chips- nationally recognized, well-established and financially sound companies- where a mutual fund company has invested in.

Where I work, or in any mutual fund, historically in 5 years’ time, investment has been seen to double.

That’s why, we advice to lock in 5 years if people want to invest in a mutual fund.

C: I guess the time has come for me to share my own investment experience. You see, I invested a little money that I had before. Just like in a mutual fund, I was asked to lock my capital for a minimum of 5 years. I could put in more money, but I couldn’t withdraw it until after that period. However, when time came for me to recover my investment, I simply got the capital back! I was told by my adviser that it was due to the financial crisis. Now, what was I supposed to do with that? Of course I was happy I got the whole of my capital back, that I didn’t lose any money. But what a waste! I could’ve invested it in another product and at least earn 5% from it.

A: Maybe the investment you did at that time had an insurance added-on.

There is a product called a VUL** or Variable Universal Life Insurance where, aside from saving for your future your principal earns interest and it offers protection. It’s a sort of 2 in 1 product: life insurance ***plus mutual fund.

It is also a good investment since the money you save will grow and accumulate. The advantage of investing in any VUL products is it offers insurance or life protection, so in case the family breadwinner or the income generator has suddenly run out of time, his remaining family members would not suffer.

May I ask which company you invested in? How come the result was only a break even after 5 years?

C: The truth is, I remember which company it was, but I don’t remember the conditions. I think the problem was, I didn’t take it too seriously at that time… (facepalm)

A: Before you choose any type of investment, you must first do a background check of the company: their historical performances, how many years have then been operating- is it at least 10 years or 20 years?- so you could avoid scams. There’s no investment where you could earn money speedily, like let’s say, double your money in 2-4 weeks. There is an investment principle where we are advised to apply the RULE of 72****.

C: What can you say about my experience? Or worse, what can you say to those who lost money in their investments? Undeniably, many people are afraid of investing, and are afraid of the term “finance”, due to the crisis that hit us…  

A: As an adviser, I would say that before entering any investment scheme like stocks, mutual fund or UITF, you should first build the foundation of your investment by securing a life insurance, because the return on the investment tools I’ve mentioned is not guaranteed… In the case where a person secures a life insurance, if something happens or let’s say he or she will be “taken out of the picture”, there’s assurance for the surviving family members or beneficiaries that they wouldn’t be burdened or worried about how to go on with their financial life.

Life insurance could also help pay loans and other liabilities. It could be used to fund obligations like college education, car loan, house or lot… at least there will be money to pay them off. If the insured breadwinner dies, at least there will be resources to supply his surviving family’s needs.

C: That is a very interesting concept you introduced there, Arnel. In fact, an article I read explained it like this: When you don’t have assets built up (as young people do in their early-work life), you are most vulnerable. In case of an emergency, your family will have nothing to fall back on. So a life insurance is a good way to provide financial protection to your family even in your absence.

In another article, I learned that one of the wealth-building strategies we didn’t know about is to incorporate the use of whole life insurance as a strong basis for a solid investment plan. In fact, Investopedia defines this just the way you explained it:

Whole life insurance is a contract with premiums that includes insurance and investment components. The insurance component pays a predetermined amount when the insured individual dies. The investment component builds an accumulated cash value the insured individual can borrow against or withdraw.

A: If your investment of choice includes an insurance feature, it’s hard to say that you end up “losing” or “earning less”. There’s a guaranteed face amount***** or insurance amount in case of death, plus you can avail of riders****** or additional benefits like critical illness, hospital expenses and disability benefits. You could benefit from it in the long run.

C: Going back to my mishap… Needless to say, my experience made me afraid to invest again. So I just keep my money in a bank. However, it does make sense to also invest some of it especially if I were to increase the value of my money.

What are my other options? I’ve thought about bonds and stock options. But the truth is I know nothing! What advice could you give me?

A: All investments involve taking risk. It’s important that when you go into any investment in stocks, bonds or mutual funds you have a full understanding that you could lose some or all of your money in any one investment. There is really risk in investment, and there’s no guarantee.

It is often said that the greater the risk, the greater the potential reward in investing, but taking on unnecessary risk is often avoidable. An investor’s best alternative to protect themselves against risk is by spreading their money among various investments, hoping that if one investment loses money, the other investments will make up for those losses. This strategy, called “diversification” which can be neatly summed up as, “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.”

Once you’ve saved money for investing, consider carefully all your options and think about what diversification strategy makes sense for you.

Diversification can’t guarantee that your investments won’t suffer if the market drops. But it can improve the chances that you won’t lose money, or that if you do, it won’t be as much as if you weren’t diversified.

Just don’t put “all your eggs” in a bank because imagine if you have 2 million Philipine Pesos (Php) saved in a bank then all of a sudden, it gets bankrupt. Take note that the maximum loss that could be covered by banks in the Philippines is 5oo thousand pesos…

Or suppose that a depositor has millions of money in a bank during times of economic and financial uncertainties. Imagine if the bank discovered that the depositor died- accounts will automatically be frozen, no cash withdrawal could be done and to top it all, the money is subject for estate tax. 

I must say that it would be the main difference between investing in a bank or in a financial services company like where I work (he he): one advantage about investing in a financial services firm is that the client has the possibility to choose that all proceeds may be free from whithholding and estate taxes. Unlike in banks, where the gains an investor acquires are subject to those two taxes, aside from the “normal” ones the government would require.

This is not to discredit banks, but just to put things in perspective with your readers.

C: Let’s say I finally dare to invest in mutual funds. Should I also diversify according to my objectives? For instance, I want to save for a down payment to buy a house? Or I’m thinking of saving for my son’s college education? That’s already 2 objectives.

Won’t I end up paying more than I should, or in other words: won’t I end up earning less than I could? 

A: The answer depends on when you will need the money, your goals, and if you will be able to sleep at night if you purchase a risky investment where you could lose your principal.

For instance, if you are saving for retirement, and you have 35 years before you retire, you may want to consider riskier investment products, knowing that if you stick to only the “savings” products or to less risky investment products, your money will grow too slowly—or, given inflation and taxes, you may lose the purchasing power of your money. A frequent mistake people make is putting money they will not need for a very long time in investments that pay a low amount of interest.

On the other hand, if you are saving for a short-term goal, five years or less, you don’t want to choose risky investments, because when it’s time to sell, you may have to take a loss. Since investments often move up and down in value rapidly, you want to make sure that you can wait and sell at the best possible time.

Time is money.

As we would say in my company, “The best time to invest was yesterday, the next best time is today. And the worst time is tomorrow. Because sometimes tomorrow becomes never.”

-The End-

Mr. Martil is a financial adviser in a leading international financial services company. He is a loving husband and father to his family. Likewise, you were able to witness what a kind and reliable friend he is- generous enough to spend time with Colorfulifesite Blog and answer some of the very basic questions about investment and mutual funds.

Glossary:

*UITF- Unit Investment Trust Funds (UITFs) are ready-made investments that allow the pooling of funds from different investors with similar investment objectives. These funds are managed by professional fund managers and are invested in various financial instruments such as money market securities, bonds and equities, which are normally available to bigger investors only. (Source: http://www.bdo.com.ph)

**VUL-Variable universal life insurance (VUL) is a form of cash-value life insurancethat offers both a death benefit and an investment feature. (Source: http://www.investopedia.com)

It is a life insurance policy that combines the features of variable life insurance and universal life insurance. Where the former constitutes a fixed premium insurance policy that provides a return based on the income performance of an investment portfolio. While the latter combines the benefits of an adjustable premium, adjustable coverage term life insurance, and a savings account. (Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com)

***Life insurance- Insurance cover that serves two major purposes: (1) to substitute for the insured’s income if he or she dies, and (2) to qualify the insured for favorable tax treatment. The policy holders buy insurance cover from an insurance company, and pay specific periodic amounts (premiums) for the term (duration or life) of the policy. If the insured dies before the this term is completed, a guaranteed sum (the face amount of the policy) is paid to one or more named beneficiaries. If the insured survives the term then, depending on the type of the policy, he or she may receive the full or a part of the face amount of the policy. (Souce: http://www.businessdictionary.com)

****Rule of 72- The “rule of 72” is a simplified way to calculate how long an investment takes to double, given a fixed annual rate of interest. You divide 72 by the annual rate of return you receive on your investments, and that number is a rough estimate of years it takes to double your money. For example, $1 invested at 10% takes 7.2 years (72 divided by 10) to turn into $2. (Source: http://www.usatoday.com)

*****Face amount- Sum of money for which an insurance cover is obtained, usually shown on the top sheet (face) of the policy. In life insurance, face amount is the sum paid on the policy’s maturity date, on the death of the insured, or (if the policy terms permit) on his or her total disability. (Source: http://www.businessdictionary.com)

******Riders- Additional clause, document, or slip of paper that adds, alters, amends, or removes the provisions of an associated or attached agreement or contract (such as an insurance policy) or a negotiable instrument. (Source: ww.businessdictionary.com)

Sources:

  1. Investopedia
  2. Business Dictionary
  3. “How Do You Make Money from UITF Investing?”, by Fitz, Ready to Be Rich Blogsite, available at: https://fitzvillafuerte.com/how-do-you-make-money-from-uitf-investing.html
  4. Unit Investment Trust Funds, available at BDO website: https://www.bdo.com.ph/personal/trust-and-investments/unit-investment-trust-funds
  5. “Doubling Your Money: The Rule of 72”, by Wes Moss, Advice IQ, USA Today, available at: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2015/04/25/adviceiq-doubling-your-money/26339307/
  6. “The #1 Wealth Building Strategy You Don’t Know About”, by Paradigmlife Blogsite, available at: http://paradigmlife.net/blog/the-1-wealth-building-strategy/
  7. “Are You Building a Strong Foundation for Creating Wealth?”, available at: http://www.firstpost.com/investing/are-you-building-a-strong-foundation-for-creating-wealth-2682980.html

5 thoughts on “Adulting and Money Management 2: “Hooray, I have money! now what?”

  1. Here’s another blog that makes a lot of sense to me!

    To be honest, articles like this really interests me as it is very relevant to people in their 30s up . As they say, we play in our teenage years, work- 20s, save- 30s, invest- 40s, generate- 50s to retire with nice stories to tell when we become sexagenarians!

    I really do agree as much as I enjoyed the inputs. One’s cash flow should be developed and managed so to save up and pay debts, then protect self with untimely events (which may take one out of the picture) and invest. There are a lot of businesses here in the Philippines which are born out of multiple loans only to end up slaughtered by competitors- and oh boy, this will not just paralyze one’s future plans but also, sense of self worth. So people have to be very careful in investing for a business.

    The thing with VUL is that one should consult a decent Financial Advisor in order for the investor to be guided well. In my case, I started to be a fanatic of VUL 3 years back and now I realized I have several- and hey this is not good. In every policy an investor signs up, he/she is bound to pay for many company fees which differ in every insurance company. What I personally suggest is that, the investor should study first as to what company to sign up with (of course we opt for the highest in net worth, assets etc, which we can easily google), choose their best product which matches your needs as a single or married person (as they have several), and lastly, you have to make sure too that your financial advisor will stick with you until your family finally enjoys the Face Amount (I mean come on, it’s part of the purchase). My personal picks are Philam Life, Sunlife and AXA- these are the companies where I personally entrusted my policies (my future).

    UITFs are also just as fine. An investor just have to make sure that the banks they will be enrolling at belongs to the , at least to my preference, TOP 3 of the country. My personal picks are BPI, BDO and Security Bank. BPI has lower unit prices as compared to BDO. BDO is currently the biggest bank of the country in aspects of assets, net worth and loans. Security Bank also was awarded years back as the best handler of UITFs with the greatest growth.

    We, your readers, should accumulate in quantity KM! Please make more articles similar to this! I am looking forward on your next blog! ETU

    Liked by 1 person

  2. C: I guess the time has come for me to share my own investment experience. You see, I invested a little money that I had before. Just like in a mutual fund, I was asked to lock my capital for a minimum of 5 years. I could put in more money, but I couldn’t withdraw it until after that period. However, when time came for me to recover my investment, I simply got the capital back! I was told by my adviser that it was due to the financial crisis. Now, what was I supposed to do with that? Of course I was happy I got the whole of my capital back, that I didn’t lose any money. But what a waste! I could’ve invested it in another product and at least earn 5% from it.

    I HAD A SIMILAR EXPERIENCE. WASTE OF TIME AND MONEY KM. IT FRUSTRATES ME EVERYTIME I GET TO REMEMBER. ALL CAPS! 😩😩😩😩

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Adulting and Money Management 2.1: The Importance of Research – colorfulifesite

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